Name Designation
Prin. Dinesh Panjwani Chairperson
CA Parag Thakkar Director
Dr. Hemlata Bagla Member
Dr. Pooja Ramchandani Member
Dr. Bhagwan Balani Member
Dr. Vijay Dabholkar Member
Dr. Mandeep Kochhar Member
Mr. Dinesh Himatsinghani Member

Choice Based Credit System

Undergraduate Programmes

Part 1

R. **** : The Definitions Of The Key Terms Used In The Choice Based Credit System And Grading System Introduced From The Academic Year 2020-2021 Are As Under:

1. Core Course: A course, which should compulsorily be studied by a candidate as a core requirement is termed as a Core course.

2. Elective Course Generally, a course which can be chosen from a pool of courses and which may be very specific or specialized or advanced or supportive to the discipline/subject of study or which provides an extended scope or which enables exposure to some other discipline/subject/domain or nurtures the candidate’s proficiency/skill is called an Elective Course.

2.1 Elective Course Elective courses may be offered by the main discipline/subject of study is referred to as Discipline Specific Elective. The University/Institute may also offer discipline related Elective courses of interdisciplinary nature (to be offered by main discipline/subject of study).

2.2 Dissertation/Project: An elective course designed to acquire Special/advanced knowledge, such as supplement study/support study to project work, and a candidate studies such a course on his own with advisory support by a teacher/faculty member is called dissertation/project. A Project / Dissertation work would be of 6 credits. A Project / Dissertation work may be given in place of a discipline-specific elective paper.

2.3 Generic Elective (GE) Course: An elective course chosen generally from an unrelated discipline/subject, to seek exposure is called a Generic Elective. P.S.: A core course offered in a discipline/subject may be treated as an elective by another discipline/subject and vice versa and such electives may also be referred to as Generic Elective.

3. Ability Enhancement Courses (AEC): The Ability Enhancement (AE) Courses may be of two kinds: Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses (AECC) and Skill Enhancement Courses (SEC). “AECC” courses are the courses based upon the content that leads to Knowledge enhancement; SEC courses are value-based and/or skill-based and are aimed at providing hands-on-training, competencies, skills, etc.

Undergraduate Programmes

Part 1

R. **** : The Definitions Of The Key Terms Used In The Choice Based Credit System And Grading System Introduced From The Academic Year 2020-2021 Are As Under:

1. Core Course: A course, which should compulsorily be studied by a candidate as a core requirement is termed as a Core course.

2. Elective Course Generally, a course which can be chosen from a pool of courses and which may be very specific or specialized or advanced or supportive to the discipline/subject of study or which provides an extended scope or which enables exposure to some other discipline/subject/domain or nurtures the candidate’s proficiency/skill is called an Elective Course.

2.1 Elective Course Elective courses may be offered by the main discipline/subject of study is referred to as Discipline Specific Elective. The University/Institute may also offer discipline related Elective courses of interdisciplinary nature (to be offered by main discipline/subject of study).

2.2 Dissertation/Project: An elective course designed to acquire Special/advanced knowledge, such as supplement study/support study to project work, and a candidate studies such a course on his own with advisory support by a teacher/faculty member is called dissertation/project. A Project / Dissertation work would be of 6 credits. A Project / Dissertation work may be given in place of a discipline-specific elective paper.

2.3 Generic Elective (GE) Course: An elective course chosen generally from an unrelated discipline/subject, to seek exposure is called a Generic Elective. P.S.: A core course offered in a discipline/subject may be treated as an elective by another discipline/subject and vice versa and such electives may also be referred to as Generic Elective.

3. Ability Enhancement Courses (AEC): The Ability Enhancement (AE) Courses may be of two kinds: Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses (AECC) and Skill Enhancement Courses (SEC). “AECC” courses are the courses based upon the content that leads to Knowledge enhancement; SEC courses are value-based and/or skill-based and are aimed at providing hands-on-training, competencies, skills, etc.

Undergraduate Programmes

Part I

R. **** : The definitions of the key terms used in the Choice Based Credit System from the Academic Year 2020-2021 are as under:

Outline of Choice Based Credit System as per University Grants Commission guidelines as under:

  1. Core Course: A course, which should compulsorily be studied by a candidate as a core requirement is termed as a Core course.
  2. Elective Course: Generally, a course which can be chosen from a pool of courses and which may be very specific or specialized or advanced or supportive to the discipline/subject of study or which provides an extended scope or which enables an exposure to some other discipline/subject/domain or nurtures the candidate’s proficiency/skill is called an Elective Course.

    2.1 Discipline Specific Elective (DSE) Course: Elective courses may be offered by the main discipline/subject of study is referred to as Discipline Specific Elective. The University/Institute may also offer discipline related Elective courses of interdisciplinary nature (to be offered by main discipline/subject of study).

    2.2 Dissertation/Project: An elective course designed to acquire Special/advanced knowledge, such as supplement study/support study to a project work, and a candidate studies such a course on his own with an advisory support by a teacher/faculty member is called dissertation/project. A Project/Dissertation work may be given in lieu of a discipline specific elective paper.

    2.3 Generic Elective (GE) Course: An elective course chosen generally from an unrelated discipline/subject, with an intention to seek exposure is called a Generic Elective.

    P.S.: A core course offered in a discipline/subject may be treated as an elective by other discipline/subject and vice versa and such electives may also be referred to as Generic Elective.

  3. Ability Enhancement Courses (AEC): The Ability Enhancement (AE) Courses may be of two kinds: Ability Enhancement Compulsory Courses (AECC) and Skill Enhancement Courses (SEC).

    “AECC” courses are the courses based upon the content that leads to Knowledge enhancement;

    SEC courses are value-based and/or skill-based and are aimed at providing hands-on-training, competencies, skills, etc.

  4. Choice Base Credit System CBCS allows students to choose inter-disciplinary, intra-disciplinary courses, skill oriented papers (even from other disciplines according to their learning needs, interests and aptitude) and more flexibility for students.
  5. Honours Program To enhance employability and entrepreneurship abilities among the learners, through aligning Inter Disciplinary / Intra Disciplinary courses with Degree Program. Honours Program will have 40 additional credits to be undertaken by the learner across three years essentially in Inter / Intra Disciplinary course.

    A learner who joins Regular Undergraduate Program can opt for Honours Program in the first year of the Program. However, the credits for honours, though divided across three years can be completed within three years to become eligible for award of honours Degree.

  6. Program: A Program is a set of courses that are linked together in an academically meaningful way and generally ends with the award of a Degree Certificate depending on the level of knowledge attained and the total duration of study of Undergraduate Programs.
  7. Course: A ‘course’ is essentially a constituent of a ‘program’ and may be conceived of as a composite of several learning topics taken from a certain knowledge domain, at a certain level. All the learning topics included in a course must necessarily have academic coherence, i.e. there must be a common thread linking the various components of a course. A number of linked courses considered together are in practice, a ‘program’.
  8. Bridge Course: Bridge course is visualized as Pre semester preparation by the learner before commencement of regular lectures. For each semester the topics, whose knowledge is considered as essential for effective and seamless learning of topics of the Semester, will be specified. The Bridge Course can be conducted in online mode. The Online content can be created for the Bridge Course Topics.
  9. Module and Unit: A course which is generally an independent entity having its own separate identity, is also often referred to as a ‘Module’ in today’s parlance, especially when we refer to a ‘modular curricular structure’. A module may be studied in conjunction with other learning modules or studied independently. A topic within a course is treated as a Unit. Each course should have Units.
  10. Self-Learning:

    20% of the topics will be marked for Self-Learning. Topics for Self-Learning are to be learned independently by the student, in a time-bound manner, using online and offline resources including online lectures, videos, library, discussion forums, field work, internships etc.

    Evaluative sessions (physical/online), equivalent to the credit allocation of the Self Learning topics, shall be conducted, preferably, every week for each course. Learners are to be evaluated real time during evaluative sessions.  The purpose of evaluative sessions is to assess the level of the students’ learning achieved in the topics earmarked for Self-Learning.

    The teacher’s role in these evaluative sessions will be that of a Moderator and Mentor, who will guide and navigate the discussions in the sessions, and offer concluding remarks, with proper reasoning on the aspects which may have been missed by the students, in the course of the Self-Learning process.

    The modes to evaluate self-learning can be a combination of the various methods such as written reports, hand-outs with gaps and MCQs, objective tests, case studies and Peer learning. Groups can be formed to present self-learning topics to peer groups, followed by Question and Answer sessions and open discussion. The marking scheme for Self Learning has been defined under Examination and Teaching.

    The topics stipulated for self-learning can be increased or reduced as per the recommendations of the Board of Studies and Academic Council from time to time. All decisions regarding evaluation need to be taken and communicated to the stakeholders preferably before the commencement of a semester. Some exceptions may be made in exigencies, like the current situation arising from the lockdown, but such ad hoc decisions are to be kept to the minimum possible.

  11. Credit Point:

    Credit Point refers to the ‘Workload’ of a learner and is an index of the number of learning hours deemed for a certain segment of learning. These learning hours may include a variety of learning activities like reading, reflecting, discussing, attending lectures / counselling sessions, watching especially prepared videos, writing assignments, preparing for examinations, etc. Credits assigned for a single course always pay attention to how many hours it would take for a learner to complete a single course successfully. A single course should have, by and large a course may be assigned anywhere between 1 to 4 credit points wherein 1 credit is construed as corresponding to approximately 12 to 15 hours.

  12. Credit Completion and Credit Accumulation:

    Credit acquisition and Credit completion shall be considered to take place after the learner has successfully cleared all the evaluation criteria with respect to a single course. Thus, a learner who successfully completes required CP (Credit Point) course may be considered to have collected or acquired total credits. Learner level of performance above the minimum prescribed level (viz. grades / marks obtained) has no bearing on the number of credits collected or acquired. A learner keeps on adding more and more credits as he completes successfully more and more courses. Thus the learner ‘accumulates’ course wise credits.

  13. Credit Bank:

    A Credit Bank refers to stored and dynamically updated information regarding the number of Credits obtained by any given learner along with details regarding the course/s for which Credit has been given, the course-level, nature, etc. In addition, all the information regarding the number of Credits transferred to different programs or credit exemptions given may also be stored with the individual’s history.

  14. Credit Transfer:

    (performance transfer) When a learner successfully completes a program, he/she is allowed to transfer his/her past performance to another academic program having some common courses and Performance transfer is said to have taken place.

  15. Course Exemption:

    Occasionally, when two academic programs offered by a single university or by more than one university, may have some common or equivalent course-content, the learner who has already completed one of these academic programs is allowed to skip these ‘equivalent’ courses while registering for the new program. The Learner is ‘exempted’ from ‘relearning’ the common or equivalent content area and from re-appearing for the concerned examinations.

    It is thus taken for granted that the learner has already collected in the past the credits corresponding to the exempted courses.